Posts Tagged ‘Dure Realitie

18
Sep
16

hold a grudge – no compromise cassette

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Here at Rebel Time Records it’s no secret that we’re all big fans of Hold A Grudge. Straight out of Montreal, Quebec, they are a perfect blend / perfect storm of punk, hardcore and oi.

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Mat, Jee-P, Scott and Dan … Hold A Grudge

As their bio says: “Hold A Grudge is a perfect mix of the anger of hardcore, street-punk’s spirit of revolt and the uncompromising attitude of Oi.”

The most recent line-up of Hold A Grudge is/was: Dan 86 on Guitar,  Jee-P  doing up Vocals, Mat Oi on Bass and Scott on Drums. Let it be noted that these guys have played in/do play in such bands as Jeunesse Apatride, Subsistance, Shotcallers, Bastard 86, King Cans and Dynamite Express…

The band got together in 2004 and broke up about 10 years later. The good news is that Hold A Grudge is  getting together for one last show on October 1st, 2016 in Montreal.

The show is a benefit for the Montreal SPCA.

The band says: “a lot of bullshit is being spread all around Montreal about pitbulls, with a breed-specific legislation (an outright ban…) creeping right around the corner. As pitbull hagreunionposterlovers, animal lovers, or just general decent human beings, we wanted to do our part to help stop the city from passing this law and help our little furry friends. THIS IS A BENEFIT SHOW FOR THE MONTREAL SPCA. They have proven to be the best allies in this debate so far and therefore we trust them completely to do the best they can with the money we will raise with this show.”

More good news! Before they broke up, the band recorded about 15 new songs. Two labels – Dure Realitie and Rebel Time Records –  have joined forces to release some of these songs on cassette. The cassette will be available for sale at the October 1, 2016 show. We’ll also have some available in the Rebel Time Records distro!

… and … here it is … 11 top tracks of punk/hardcore/oi … !

Back in 2010, Hold A Grudge released a full-length called “Doing Time” on Insurgence Records … you can stream it right the heck here courtesy of Dying Scene … that should hold you until the “No Compromise” cassette come out!

Here’s a few reviews of “Doing Time” that give you a good feel for what the band is all about…

“Goes to show you can’t always judge an album by it sleeve. Hold A Grudge, I was convinced were going to be tough-guy metallic Hardcore, but truth be told their style is hagheadsubstantially more fitting with the Insurgence roster than their image might suggest. There’s a well-built crossover at play here that incorporates Oi! and Street Punk fundamentals, excellently balancing the Gorilla Biscuit-styled Hardcore that represents the flipside to Hold A Grudge. Bands like Agnostic Front, Murphy’s Law and Youth Brigade were master craftsmen of this technique and it’s a fusion I’m more than partial to. Being based as they are out of Montreal, Canada (and considering the label it’s being issued on) there’s a characteristic left-leaning social stance to Hold A Grudge, which is a welcome departure from some of the current generation of Hardcore bands. A promising contribution.” (Riot 77)

“Hold A Grudge are classic mid-paced hardcore, the good old solid kind that’ll get you through a bad day with enough left over for a pleasant supper. While at first it may seem like there’s nothing particularly groundbreaking about the sound, listen a bit more closely hagnocompand you’ll find there’s plenty of originality on show, more than enough to make it enjoyable to the ears rather than just a task they have to endure. Beyond the initial intensity we’ve come to love from the style, there’s a strong street edge that’s well-executed and is a respectful nod to their oldschool punk and Oi! forbears. And the smooth tightness that you’d expect from bandmates who’ve done hard time together is all present and correct.
Lyrics adopt a posi attitude with a sussed social conscience, but don’t forget that everyday life can be tough at times. HAG know that survival doesn’t always come easy and occasionally carries a heavy price, but never forget that the good times always outweigh the bad. It’s clear that the need for unity underpins much of their thinking, and who can argue with that?
Altogether, this album is far more a pleasure than a chore and is a cut above much of what passes for hardcore these days.” (Old Punks Never Die)

“Hardcore punks Hold A Grudge know how to make a riff stick: by nail-gunning it to your noodle. The beauty of knowing what you’re doing reveals itself in the command of the tools of your trade, and the Montreal five-piece show themselves to be master craftsmen on this sophomore release, graduates of the old school of punk and hardcore where power haglogotwoand precision drove your points home. Hold A Grudge reference much in the way of both East and West Coast hardcore of yore, as well as British punk and Oi! of yesteryear, but veteran sensibilities keep the gang vocals, rolling drum thunder and flying up-front guitars both fat and fresh, and fans of the form will be hard-pressed to find any doing it better.” (Hour Community)

24
Jan
16

interview – les trois huit

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TorontoJuly304UPDATE (March 12, 2016): Les Trois Huit will in Quebec / Ontario in July 2016 … Rebel Time Records is chuffed to be presenting their two Ontario shows …  Hamilton at This Ain’t Hollywood on July 29th and Coalition in Toronto on July 30th … also on the bill(s) will be The Strike and The Fallout, Final Four and at least a couple of other top-shelf street-punk outfits…

And, as well, Rebel Time Records is pleased as pie to be releasing, in conjunction with some other boss labels like Dure Realitie, Rusty Knife, Aggro Beat and Rumagna Sgroza, a split 7″ featuring Les Trois Huit and Les Partisans!

 

LTHCANUCKTOURPOSTEROne of the highlights of 2015 was coming across this great militant antifa streetpunk band from Grenoble, France. Thanks to the Action Sedition crew for bringing Les Trois Huit to our ears and attention!

What follows is an interview with Les Trois Huit that was done very recently by the folks at Dure Realitie zine/label out of Quebec.

Huge thanks to Mathieu (host of Sous Pression) for the translation…Sous Pression radio highlights some of the best in francophone punk, ska, hardcore, and oi! from every corner of the french-speaking world…well worth a listen…

Hopefully we’ll have another interview or two from LTH before they make their way over here…

FYI: you can download the band’s new album for FREE at the Les Trois Huit website!

 

Here’s a short interview with a band that Dure Realitie is working with to distribute their self-titled album. Les Trois Huit, an antifascist Oi! and streetpunk band from Grenoble (France). Enjoy!

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First of all, for the sake of those who might not have heard of you yet, could you introduce the band and its members?

Well first of all, hello to everyone!

We are Les Trois Huit, or LTH, from Grenoble. We play a a mix of streetpunk and oi!. We are an activist group fighting for a society free from oppression, for a mixed and popular society. We’re active through our lyrics, through our DIY and egalitarian approach, and through our own activist activities.

The band formed three years ago without really know how to play our instruments, but we tried to take things slow, did our best, and stayed true to ourselves, and now we just released our first album.

As for the band members, there’s Rubz on vocals, Riad on bass, Numa on guitar, Polo on rhythm, Rouk on drums, and Rémi is the sound engineer.

What does your band name, Les Trois Huit, mean?

In France, Les Trois Huit is a rhythm of work in a lot of factories and stores. There are three teams that work 8 hours each: from 5am to 1pm, then from 1pm to 9pm, and thenLTHLogo3 from 9pm to 5am. You have a team and you work from one week to another.
It’s a rhythm of work that throws you off completely, that fucks with your social life and you family life…

Even if none of us work under this regime of work anymore, it’s something we’ve experienced that we wanted to give nod to our working-class roots. We’re also proud of that part of our lives, and we’re showing it through our name.

On top of that, it’s the number of the département we live in, of our city Grenoble, and its surrounding areas. [Translators Note: A département in France is similar to a province or state. Each département has both a name, and a regional number.]

What are some of your influences?

Well, in LTH, some of our members come from different musical backgrounds. Numa and Rubz are from a more urban background, more Hip Hop, Riad is more ska, Polo only listens to oi!, and Rouk comes more from the hardcore punk scene. Every member comes with their own baggage, which is what makes LTH. If we had to list some bands that have influences us, we’d have to say that it went from Brigada Flores Magon to Bad Manners, but also Singe Des Rues, Bull Brigade, Les Partisans, Molodoï, Non Servium, Hors Contrôle, Los Foiros, Bolchoï, Nabat…

But seriously, the guys in the band really listen to just about everything, so obviously we’re influenced by a lot of things.

What have some of the band’s memorable moments?

LTHLogo2There have been a lot of memorable moments. Well, for one our first practice sessions were a disaster. Some of us have shared overnight stays in jail, our old guitarist Tonton leaving the band, working overnight to build our practice space, and lately, the release of our album in Grenoble, which was for us a really great moment with lots of friends.

Your lyrics are clearly political Are you also active with any activist collectives of groups? If so, which ones?

Yeah, it’s obvious that most of our lyrics are political. When you sing about your vision of life in general, and that you think critically of things that surround you, then you’re obviously being political. But singing political songs isn’t enough. Just being political at concerts and then going out to party is too easy. You have to be political all of the time: at work, in the streets, in collectives and other groups. At the very least, we’re all unionized. There are some of us who were in the CNT, but are now in SUD, others are in their own unions at work. Otherwise, we also participate in a lot of protests, and we organize things in our own city. For the moment, our main involvement outside of the band is in our workplace.

What are some of the current struggles going on in Grenoble?

Well at the moment, one of the bigger struggles has to do with housing, and squats that are being evicted by the city.

In fact, our city is run by an environmental and leftist council. During their campaign, LTHCD2they said they would support the squats and stop the evictionss, but we can see that this obviously isn’t what’s happening. Roma people are bearing the biggest brunt of their political plans, which consists only of evictions without any long term, sustainable housing and integration plan.

Our feminist comrades also have a strong presence in Grenoble. Although we aren’t really members of any of their collectives, we support them 100%, because for us, being antifascist is being realistic and willing to struggle against all forms of oppression, including the struggle against male domination over women.

Given the current climate in France, there are also struggles against the state of emergency and state abuses. Random arrests, house arrests for people who have nothing to do with fundamentalists and have no interest in blowing anything up.

There’s a lot to fight against. These are dirty times.

Musically speaking, what’s the revolutionary scene in region like?

lthpic3To talk of a revolutionary scene in relation to what is happening around here is, in our opinion, seeing things a bit through rose coloured glasses. We can’t really speak of a revolutionary scene around here. When we speak more of alternative scenes, Grenoble is a pretty lively city. There are some pretty good punk, surf or coldwave bands coming out of the squats. There is one particular collective, L’Armée Des Zombies, that makes it possible for a number of punk and rock bands to exist. There is also a big metal, hip hop, and trance scene. In fact, there is a pretty big musical diversity for a city this size. As for politics, it’s less about the music and more about collectives, organizations, and associations. We also have our friends in the ultras from stands RK94 and DB07 who do a lot of good work in the stands and in the city.

As for music, there are a few political bands out there, but nowhere close to being a majority.

We know that the redskin movement was really strong in France in the 1990s and 2000s. They seem to have disappeared a bit over the last few years, but there also seems to be a re-emergence of redskin bands such as yours. Would you say that we’re witnessing a renewal of the movement in France? Would you say that you’re part of this renewal? What’s your relationship with the movement?

Honestly, it might be a bit too soon to talk about a renewal, but there has been a resurgence of antifa collectives these last few years, made up in part by redskins. This has pretty much the natural response to the growth of neo-fascist groups in our country.

Although we clearly identify with the antifa movement, we don’t necessarily label lthbandourselves as redskins. We don’t want to assume that title and we have much respect for what they did in the 90s. The most important thing for us isn’t how you label yourself, but what you say and what you do, not what you claim to be.

But we know that, when you look at us, we’re not too far off from looking like a bunch of reds! Hahaha!

Are there any bands from your region that you would recommend, regardless of style?

Well, there are our friends’ bands, obviously. We’ll give them a bit of a shout out! Les Partisans (recently reunited), the Profs de Skids, Guarapita, Resaka Sonora, Bull Brigade, Lorelei, Retrograd, DK Les Sales Gueules, Flo Mescouyenski, Motor Riot, Les Chevals Hongrois, Habemus Papam, les Tôle Boyz…

Do you have anything to say to people in Québec who are discovering you now?

Well, we’re obviously really proud and happy that our music is being heard over there, lthgroup2and we hope that you’ll like our stuff. Whatever we do, it comes from the heart, and that’s what’s most important to us.

We really hope to come play in Québec on day, and to get to know the scene a bit better, especially since it has such a great reputation here.

Other than that, take care of yourselves.

Don’t give up your struggles, your values, and your ideals.

We can’t forget that, as activists, despite our differences, we are all brothers and sisters, from both sides of the Atlantic, even without knowing each other!

UNI.E.S NOUS SOMMES ET NOUS LE RESTERONS///
UNITED WE ARE, UNITED WE WILL ALWAYS BE///

And, here is a nice review of Les Trois Huit’s debut album, from the Oi Of America blog:

“I have never heard of this band before I got this promo and thank the gods I got this promo because this band is a pleasant surprise. From the sounds of, what I think is spray paint cans in the intro of “Writer” this record had my full attention. Pleasant surprise is understating the howling power this band delivers on “Writer” and “Liberi Tutti“.  On these first two tracks the band delivers  two songs that will shake the bones of your ancestors in the choruses, with boot party beats and great riffs. Then bam! catchy ska beats and up beat vocals keeps “Uni-e-s” very danceable, while the chorus is rooted in melodic street punk. This song keeps both sounds working together to deliver a strong sound and a even better song.

For those that do not like to dance and only want boot to concrete Oi! the band delivers the goods on “Travailler“. This song is a mid tempo stomp that keeps the energy building in the bottom end while the harsh vocals conveys a heavy dose of skinhead attitude.  With a wall of attitude and a sound that would make Motorhead proud, “Gernoble” hits with a thuggish power and hammering riffs. The slow and low lead vocals add to the menacing sound. To sum this song up in one word it would be, brutal.  The band gives us a big dose of melody on the infectious “Au Fond Des Yeux“. The neo- ska beat will keep your toe tapping while the angular guitar lead and aggro filled choruses will keep this song firmly rooted in Oi!. I keep listening to this record over and over, so much of this record hits like a ton of bricks but one of the songs I keep coming back to is the Le Partisans cover “Pas De Quartier“. If this song does not get your blood flowing with it’s dynamic guitars and surging rhythms, then you are fucking dead.

Man I really wished I would have reviewed this record last year because my best of 2015 would have had this record firmly on it. This album gets better and better on each listen. With all the new bands worldwide coming out, please do not let this hammer of a record slip through the cracks.”




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